An International Legal Review of the Relationship between Brain Death and Organ

Fecha 16/4/2018 7:04:00 | Categoría: Bioetica y Legislación

Aramesh K, Arima H, Gardiner D, Shah SK. An International Legal Review of the Relationship between Brain Death and Organ Transplantation. J Clin Ethics. 2018 Spring;29(1):31-42.

Disponible: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29565795
Abstract

The "dead-donor rule" states that, in any case of vital organ donation, the potential donor should be determined to be dead before transplantation occurs. In many countries around the world, neurological criteria can be used to legally determine death (also referred to as brain death). Nevertheless, there is considerable controversy in the bioethics literature over whether brain death is the equivalent of biological death. This international legal review demonstrates that there is considerable variability in how different jurisdictions have evolved to justify the legal status of brain death and its relationship to the dead-donor rule. In this article, we chose to review approaches that are representative of many different jurisdictions-the United States takes an approach similar to that of many European countries; the United Kingdom's approach is followed by Canada, India, and influences many other Commonwealth countries; Islamic jurisprudence is applicable to several different national laws; the Israeli approach is similar to many Western countries, but incorporates noteworthy modifications; and Japan's relatively idiosyncratic approach has received some attention in the literature. Illuminating these different justifications may help develop respectful policies regarding organ donation within countries with diverse populations and allow for more informed debate about brain death and the dead-donor rule.



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